Spices Of Life From Your Kitchen Shelf

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Man, do I have some great news here or not?

Yes, I know just what you must be thinking, here's another sales pitch! Well in a way you are right, but not entirely, please wait a moment, just read this and you will see that there really is no actual sales pitch and yes, wherever you eventually end up getting this natural product or what brand you actually end up buying will be entirely up to you. So, you see, I'm not selling you anything, I am sharing with you some amazing results someone other than me, is getting, and she is sharing her incredible results with the world for free. 


WANT TO LOOK AS YOUNG AS PAMELA DOES AT 52? HERE'S HOW SHE DOES IT: 


DIET
Pamela, who is of South Asian origin, eats a super-healthy diet based largely on vegetables and topped up with good proteins such as salmon.
Fresh-faced: Pamela eats a daily handful of almonds and eats a vegetable-based diet
Fresh-faced: Pamela eats a daily handful of almonds and eats a vegetable-based diet
Many of the dishes she makes are Asian and are spiced up with ginger, cumin and turmeric, among others, which she says act a bit like food supplements in terms of the health benefits.
Breakfast is usually an organic boiled egg served with gluten-free toast or organic oatcakes and coconut yoghurt with fresh berries and nuts.

To finish off the meal, she has a glass of coconut water with added liquid iron, which she says is key for stopping her iron levels plummeting as she ages.
Lunch comes in the shape of a salad prepared at home in the morning and usually contains a mixture of organic spinach, kale, rocket, cucumber, tomatoes, olives, red peppers, avocado, bean-sprouts and sauerkraut [pickled cabbage].

Fresh basil and coriander add flavour while pumpkin and sunflower seeds add crunch. 'For protein I’ll add some Arbroath salmon, eggs or chicken and dress the salad with organic olive oil and lemon juice,' she adds.
'I also add cayenne pepper and lots of black pepper.'
Dinner is equally healthy and usually consists of a portion of organic chicken, oily fish or a lamb steak served with a 'mountain of vegetables' - broccoli and courgettes are favourites.
She also eats a daily handful of almonds, snacks on celery and houmus and limits her coffee intake to one a day.

Most of what she eats is organic and she drinks water throughout the day, usually flavoured with a squeeze of fresh lime juice.

EXERCISE
Pamela does a body conditioning class once a week and follows that with a fitness yoga session immediately afterwards.
While at the gym, she uses the sauna and steam room and does a whole body exfoliation. She also uses the time to use a hair mask - she likes Aveda's Damage Remedy.
'I’ll go in the sauna for 10 minutes then have a freezing cold shower until the water stops,' she adds.
'I love it – it makes me feel so invigorated and I’m convinced it has helped to tone my skin. Then I will have 10 minutes in the steam and repeat the cold shower.'

BODY CARE
Pamela moisturises her body with coconut oil twice a day and says it keeps her skin 'incredibly soft and nourished'.
She also uses a body brush before showering and prefers paraben-free shower gel brands such as Sai Sei or Faith in Nature.
Once a week, she detoxes by soaking in a bath topped up with pink Himalayan salt crystals and scrubs her feet each day while showering. 



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3150713/52-year-old-mother-appears-twenties-reveals-stays-youthful.html#ixzz3fFRgc8A9
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She Is Not Yours Till You Have Been More Hers!

“I can have no advice or criticism for a person so sincere; but, if I give my impression of him, I will say, ‘He says too constantly of Nature, she is mine.’ She is not yours till you have been more hers.”
Few things reveal your intellect and your generosity of spirit — the parallel powers of your heart and mind — better than how you give feedback, especially if it is to a friend and especially if the work in question leaves something to be desired. Evidence like Samuel Beckett’s masterwork of tough love and poet Thom Gunn’s role in Oliver Sacks’s evolution as a writer further impresses how rare the masters of this delicate, monumental art of constructive criticism are.
But there is no greater genius at it than trailblazing journalist, essayist, and editorMargaret Fuller, whose 1845 book Woman in the Nineteenth Century endures as a foundational text of feminism. It originated as an essay titled “The Great Lawsuit. Man versus Men. Woman versus Women,” published two years earlier in the influential Transcendentalist magazine The Dial, of which Fuller had become founding editor — elected over Ralph Waldo Emerson, who was also being considered for the position — in 1839.
In the fall of 1841 — shortly after moving into Emerson’s house and around the time he was contemplating the true measure of meaningful labor in his famous diary — 24-year-old Henry David Thoreau, urged by Emerson, submitted one of his poems to The Dial. What he received from Fuller was a rejection on the surface but an enormous and generous gift at its heart — in a lengthy and immeasurably beautiful letter, she delineated the reasons for the poem’s rejection and offered caring constructive feedback on how to improve not only his writing but the very soul from which it springs.
Fuller’s masterpiece of constructive criticism is preserved in the original byProject REVEAL at Harry Ransom Center and was included in the 1907 volumeHeralds of American Literature: A Group of Patriot Writers of the Revolutionary and National Periods (public library) by essayist and literary culture champion Annie Russell Marble.
Fuller's original handwritten letter to Thoreau (Harry Ransom Center)
On October 18, 1841, Fuller — herself only thirty-one — writes:
I do not find the poem on the mountains improved by mere compression, though it might be by fusion and glow. 

Its merits to me are, a noble recognition of Nature, two or three manly thoughts, and, in one place, a plaintive music.

With great sensitivity to every artist’s vulnerable tendency to take criticism of his or her work as criticism of his or her character, Fuller envelops her critique of Thoreau the poet in great warmth for Thoreau the person, assuring him that behind his mediocre poem lies great potential — but making clear that he must work diligently at it in order to attain it:
Yet, now that I have some knowledge of the man, it seems there is no objection I could make to his lines (with the exception of such offenses against taste as the lines about the humors of the eye…), which I would not make to himself. 

He is healthful, rare, of open eye, ready hand, and noble scope. He sets no limits to his life, nor to the invasions of nature; he is not willfully pragmatical, cautious, ascetic, or fantastical. But he is as yet a somewhat bare hill, which the warm gales of Spring have not visited… He will find the generous office that shall educate him…

Although she is only seven years Thoreau’s senior, barely in her thirties herself, Fuller brims with precocious wisdom. More than a century before Grace Paley asserted in her advice to aspiring writers that “in order to function in their trade, writers must live in the world,” Fuller gently points Thoreau to the greatest education for a writer — life itself, the richness of experience amassed by living it, and the enlarging effects of human relationships:
The unfolding of affections, a wider and deeper human experience, the harmonizing influences of other natures, will mould the man and melt his verse. 

He will seek thought less and find knowledge the more. I can have no advice or criticism for a person so sincere; but, if I give my impression of him, I will say, “He says too constantly of Nature, she is mine.” She is not yours till you have been more hers. Seek the lotus, and take a draught of rapture. 

Say not so confidently, all places, all occasions are alike. This will never come true till you have found it false.

After encouraging him to keep submitting his work and to write to her, Fuller — a century before George Orwell’s famous admonition against “stale metaphors, similes and idioms” — adds:
Will you finish the poem in your own way, and send it for the ‘Dial’? Leave out

“And seem to milk the sky.”

The image is too low; Mr. Emerson thought so too.
She ends with the kind of signature that embodies what Virginia Woolf meant in calling letter-writing “the humane art” and makes one wistful for its death:
Farewell! May truth be irradiated by Beauty! Let me know whether you go to the lonely hut, and write to me about Shakespeare, if you read him there. I have many thoughts about him, which I have never yet been led to express.

Margaret F.